Los Angeles Wage and Hour Class Action Attorney

Verdicts/ Settlements

$12.75 million global class action settlement in the related matters of Bystrom v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC525991; Connell v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC523172; Paksy v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC523491; Sharobiem v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., U.S. District Court, C.D. Cal. Case No. No. 2:13-CV-9426-GHK (FFMx); and Uppal v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., U.S. District Court, N.D. Cal. Case No. 3:14-cv-02629-VC

$3 million global class action settlement in the related matters of Stark v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC476431; Ibrahim v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC489738; Heiati v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC501118; Schwartz v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC502723; Woods v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC526977; and Costello v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. BC570812


Lawyer for Unpaid Wages and Overtime in Southern California

California Wage and Hour Violations

Under California law, employers are required to provide accurate and itemized wage statements for wages earned during that pay period. These wage statements are to state time that is actually worked, overtime earned, and expense reimbursements (if applicable). Sometimes, employers may set up a work week in a way to avoid paying overtime for overtime hours that are worked, or wage statements may show overtime hours worked but payment at the regular rate. Other times, employees may be required to perform work off the clock for which they are not compensated. This may occur with certain jobs which involve driving to multiple locations, such as where an employer may require you to “check-in” at one location and then drive off the clock to another, or where your job requires you to drive in between job sites.


California Overtime Violations

In terms of overtime compensation, employees are to receive 1.5 times pay (“time and a half”) for any time worked over eight hours in a single day or more than 40 hours in a week. If the time worked carries on into more than 12 hours in a single day or 60 hours in a week, this rate increases to double pay (twice the employee’s hourly rate). Employers may try to misclassify a non-exempt hourly employee as being “exempt”, and therefore not entitled to the overtime compensation to which “non-exempt” employees are otherwise entitled. Other times, employers may set up a work week in a way to avoid paying overtime for overtime hours that are worked, or wage statements may show overtime hours worked but payment at the regular rate.


Other Violations

Employers are required to provide accurate and itemized wage statements for wages earned during that pay period. These wage statements are to state time that is actually worked, overtime earned, and expense reimbursements for things such as travel expenses or, in certain instances, gas or mileage incurred driving between job sites.

Employers must also provide meal and rest periods or provide compensation to employees for missed meal and rest periods. Sometimes this can be as simple as not providing rest periods or lunch breaks. Other times, employers may require employees to stay “on-call” during a meal period, where the employee may suddenly have to cut their meal short to report for a job. This is also not a true, uninterrupted break, and the employee may be owed compensation for this missed time.

Other times, employers may try to deduct from your paycheck as a penalty for inadvertent mistakes, or not pay you your final paycheck on time. If an employee is fired, the employer must provide the final paycheck at the time of termination (immediately). The same rule applies if the employee quits and gives at least 72 hours notice – the final check is then due on the last day of work. If an employee quits without notice, the employer must provide the employee’s final paycheck within 72 hours.

If any of these violations are happening to you, they may be happening to other employees throughout the company, and is the type of matter where strength in numbers may be appropriate to achieve the compensation which you and other employees are owed.

If you feel you have been subject to such illegal practices by your employer, it is important to contact an attorney who is experienced in standing up to large corporations and litigating complex class action cases, to obtain the maximum recovery which you are owed. Contact the attorneys at Dadgostar Law LLP for a free case evaluation today: (310) 820-1022.